MLK Blog

 

Equality & Inclusion: The Dream of Dreams

Martin Luther King Day is a Federal Holiday celebrating the life and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. An influential African American Civil Rights Leader, he dreamt of a better tomorrow in which all people of color would be treated with the same respect as their white counterparts. Known for his campaigns to end racial segregation and equality around the world, his beliefs paved the way for many people. He helped change the mindset of many while also inspiring millions to strive for more than they could ever have ever imagined. One man’s dream, one man’s courage changed America.



Former President Ronald Reagan with Coretta Scott King



Martin Luther King Day

How it Came to Be

In 1983, then President Ronald Reagan signed a bill creating the U.S. Holiday to honor Dr. King. Years after campaigning by many activists, including members of the Congress and Coretta Scott King, civil rights leader and wife of Martin Luther King Jr would be honored. Following his death, the bill became a law in 1983. Martin Luther King Day was officially first observed in 1986 but was not observed by all states until 2000.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day has now become one of the most recognized holidays known, as many refer to a day for community service. As a leader and known activist, King spoke of service, community and equality, as well as nonviolence. In recognition of the day, many feel it is their duty to reach out and help others in various ways. Whether big or small it is a day that we can keep the spirit of Dr. King alive by coming together through volunteering, giving back to charity and much more.



Photos of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr



Why is it Important?

The Legacy MLK Left Behind

Why is Martin Luther King Jr Day important? MLK Day is important as it honors the life of a fighter for racial justice and equality. A fighter, who brought hope and healing to America without even raising a fist. Dr. King showed his heart and beliefs with the world spreading the idea of a color-blind society using his words to inspire all. He lived and died fighting for freedom and a better future. Not only did he stand up for his race, but with his words he also spoke for every nationality so that no one would feel segregated again. This Holiday should not be known as a “Black People Holiday,” but known as the People’s Holiday, for all People.